Scientific dissemination articles

CLIMATE CHANGE – AQUACULTURE AND FISHERIES, A. COram

CLIMATE CHANGE – AQUACULTURE AND FISHERIES, A. Coram, UK

pp. 47-66  |  Article Number: 3
Published Online: June, 2018

Abstract
This article considers the current and future effects of climate change on marine food production. Case studies relevant to the North Atlantic are used to highlight key topics, and bring broad-scale issues into focus with local or regional examples. The main oceanographic aspects of climate change (global temperature changes, changes in ocean composition/acidity and changes in weather patterns) are discussed with reference to their likely and potential impacts on aquatic food production. Ecological changes are addressed along with their likely impacts on the sector. Climate change threatens the functional stability of coastal ecosystems, which are often under pressure from anthropogenic influences. Changes in species distribution and levels of ocean productivity will have profound implications for future sustainable fisheries. Communities which are highly dependent on marine resources are often those that are likely to be most greatly affected by climate change. There is a need for adaptive mechanisms to be employed in the aquatic food production to cope with changes already being felt. The high levels of associated uncertainty (in both climatic and socio-economic models) make forecasting future trends difficult, but by considering strategies currently in use, we can make predictions about future resource management. As well as negative consequences, climate change is likely to present new opportunities for fisheries and aquaculture. Industries which are well prepared for these consequences are most likely to capitalise on these opportunities. The article concludes by reviewing the major relevant issues, and the research and investment required to lessen the negative effects of climate change.


This scientific article was prepared as the basis for pedagogical material which is being developed by the EduCO2cean project team. The magazine articles are not intended for use as teaching material in their own right.

 

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